Sinopse

Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Martha Kearney

Episódios

  • 19/06/2020

    19/06/2020

    19/06/2020 Duração: 45min

    Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.

  • 18/06/2020

    18/06/2020

    18/06/2020 Duração: 45min

    Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.

  • 17/06/2020

    17/06/2020

    18/06/2020 Duração: 45min

    Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.

  • 16/06/2020

    16/06/2020

    16/06/2020 Duração: 45min

    Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.

  • 15/06/2020

    15/06/2020

    15/06/2020 Duração: 45min

    Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.

  • McCartney on Vegetarianism, Glastonbury and Xmas Carols

    McCartney on Vegetarianism, Glastonbury and Xmas Carols

    12/12/2019 Duração: 15min

    In an exclusive interview for Radio 4's World at One, Sir Paul McCartney tells Sarah Montague how his 'Meat Free Monday' campaign came about, shares his thoughts on young climate change activists, and his unreleased record of Christmas carols, made just for his family. He also talks about appearing at Glastonbury in 2020. (Photo: Sir Paul McCartney, with presenter Sarah Montague Credit: Sir Paul McCartney)

  • 15/11/2019

    15/11/2019

    15/11/2019 Duração: 45min

    Mon-Thurs: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Sarah Montague. Fri: Analysis of news and current affairs, presented by Mark Mardell.

  • Jeremy Corbyn interview

    Jeremy Corbyn interview

    11/09/2017 Duração: 24min

    The Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn talks to Martha Kearney about the crisis in Yemen and his party's approach to Brexit. (Photo: Jeremy Corbyn. Credit: BBC)

  • The British PR firms role in South African politics - Part 4

    The British PR firm's role in South African politics - Part 4

    04/08/2017 Duração: 15min

    In a series of pieces, Manveen Rana has been investigating the relationship between political power in South Africa, a London-based PR firm, and one of the country's richest families. As the President faces a vote of no confidence, what links Jacob Zuma, the Gupta Brothers and Bell Pottinger Public Relations? And, with anger at corruption spilling over from the streets to parliament, has Nelson Mandela's rainbow nation been put in jeopardy by a political campaign born in Britain? (Photo: Protesters in South Africa. Credit: Getty Images)

  • The British PR firms role in South African politics - Part 3

    The British PR firm's role in South African politics - Part 3

    03/08/2017 Duração: 10min

    Until recently, South Africa was hailed as one of the so-called BRICS - the developing economies, growing at such a rate of knots, they were soon to join the economic premier league. Not anymore. Next week, President Jacob Zuma faces a vote of no confidence, fuelled by accusations of financial corruption on a gargantuan scale. One of the principal businesses to have been roped into the scandals are the Gupta brothers, a family whose tentacles extend from media-ownership to railways, coalmines and armaments; the common thread being the ownership of formerly state-run companies. The Guptas have been the subject of highly critical media coverage, as well as a report by the South African public protector's office into their links to government ministers, President Zuma himself, and members of his family. The Guptas strenuously deny any suggestion of corrupt behaviour. Indeed, not only have they submitted sworn affidavits to the contrary, but they say the media is in the hands of a 'white monopoly capital',

  • The British PR firm’s role in South African politics – Part 2

    The British PR firm’s role in South African politics – Part 2

    02/08/2017 Duração: 12min

    It is 23 years since the birth of South Africa's Rainbow Nation and it stands at a watershed. Its President, Jacob Zuma, is facing a vote of no confidence in parliament next week, which could see him kicked out of office in a country increasingly angry at his conspicuous enrichment, while the poorest get poorer. At issue is the President's relationship with one of South Africa's richest families, the Gupta brothers. In the second of her four part investigative series, Manveen Rana, looks into the allegation that the British PR firm, Bell Pottinger, was hired, in part, to inflame racial tensions on behalf of the Guptas, in order to distract from a massive financial scandal at the heart of Government - an allegation that Bell Pottinger deny.

  • The British PR firm’s role in South African politics - Part 1

    The British PR firm’s role in South African politics - Part 1

    01/08/2017 Duração: 14min

    The PR firm Bell Pottinger has often courted controversy with its choice of clients; they represented the Paralympian Oscar Pistorius after he was charged with murder, Asma al-Assad the Syrian first lady, and the Pinochet Foundation, whilst the former Chilean dictator was being detained in Britain. But the latest crisis the company faces could be the most challenging yet - they stand charged of fomenting racial tensions in the tinderbox of post-apartheid South Africa. In his first broadcast interview following the scandal, the CEO of Bell Pottinger is adamant that this was never their intention. Manveen Rana has the first of four special investigative reports across the week. (Photo: Demonstrators protesting against the South African president. Credit: Getty Images)

  • How close are we to effectively treating Alzheimers?

    How close are we to effectively treating Alzheimer's?

    27/06/2017 Duração: 12min

    Despite decades of research, 99% of clinical trials on new drugs for Alzheimer's disease have failed, meaning there is still no cure. But scientists believe it is not the drugs which do not work, it is the trials. To test the theory, work is about to begin on the world's biggest and most in-depth study to find the earliest signs of Alzheimer's in people. Scientists believe that if the drugs were used earlier, before the clinical symptoms of memory loss, they could slow the onset of the disease or even stop it entirely. Andrew Bomford takes a closer look at the research. (Photo: Brain scans. Credit: BBC)

  • Sir John Major: Dubious about deal with the DUP

    Sir John Major: 'Dubious' about deal with the DUP

    13/06/2017 Duração: 16min

    Sir John Major has said he is "wary" and "dubious" about Theresa May striking a deal with the DUP to give her government a majority. The former Conservative prime minister, who was one of the architects of the peace process in Northern Ireland, told the World at One the peace process in Northern Ireland was "fragile" and "under stress" and said there was a danger the UK government wouldn't be seen as impartial if it was "locked into a parliamentary deal at Westminster with one of the Northern Ireland parties". Sir John said he had sympathy with Theresa May trying to shore up her parliamentary position but that she could carry on without a deal, an option he said would be without "baggage". (Photo: Sir John Major. Credit: PA)

  • The World at One Election Family - Part 3

    The World at One Election Family - Part 3

    02/06/2017 Duração: 08min

    With polling day less than a week away, heated arguments are bound to be happening in homes around the country. Our election family are used to that. They are the Groves and are from Rowley Regis, near Dudley in the Midlands, and their cousins, the Stevens live nearby. In the third episode of her series, our reporter Becky Milligan has joined the family for a night out playing bingo at the local social club. It's also the first time Becky meets someone she has heard a lot about, Danny. He is Imogen Grove's step-father, she calls him Dad, and he's been Tina's partner for over 20 years.

  • Hugh Sykes: Election reflections from around the UK

    Hugh Sykes: Election reflections from around the UK

    01/06/2017 Duração: 25min

    As a foreign correspondent Hugh Sykes usually reports from abroad, from Iraq, Turkey, Germany, Pakistan. But ahead of the general election on June 8th, he was given an interesting assignment - to visit three former industrial areas in the UK, to find out how they are changing and what undercurrents may be at play in the lead up to polling day. So here are his 'Election reflections' from Teesside, the former Yorkshire coalfields and South Wales.

  • How policing took me close to the edge

    How policing took me close to the edge

    31/05/2017 Duração: 15min

    John Sutherland was a high flier who joined the police in the early 1980s. At the height of his career he was appointed borough commander in Southwark in London, with its share of murders and violence. He was also a trained hostage negotiator. In 2013 he realised he could not cope anymore and has now written a memoir called Blue detailing his experience. He spoke to our reporter Becky Milligan. (Photo: John Sutherland. Credit: Zac Crawley)

  • The World at One Election Family - Part 2

    The World at One Election Family - Part 2

    15/05/2017 Duração: 09min

    Over the coming weeks our reporter Becky Milligan will be talking to The World at One family from the Midlands about the issues affecting them which have been raised in the general election campaign. Some families vote the same way, this family doesn't. In this second report Becky meets Imogen's boyfriend Kierten, who like her is a first time voter. She also meets Imogen's cousin Ashley, who is a long distance lorry driver, and will be voting Conservative.

  • The World at One Election Family - Part 1

    The World at One Election Family - Part 1

    10/05/2017 Duração: 12min

    Over the coming weeks our reporter Becky Milligan will be talking to The World at One family from the Midlands about the issues affecting them which have been raised in the general election campaign. Some families vote the same way, this family doesn't. In our first report Becky meets some of them in a local pub.

  • Homosexuality: Tough to find role models

    Homosexuality: 'Tough to find role models''

    13/04/2017 Duração: 13min

    It is 50 years since the law that decriminalised homosexuality was passed. John Browne, who was the chief executive of the energy company BP between 1995 and 2007, kept his sexuality secret for the first 50 years of his life. After being outed by the Daily Mail in 2007 he became the first person, leading a major publicly-traded company, to acknowledge that he is gay. But he later stepped down after revelations about his homosexual affair. In 2014 he published The Glass Closet: Why Coming Out Is Good Business. Lord Browne told Becky Milligan that in the business world it is tough to find role models, and if gay people come in to the sector and see no one like them at the top, they will go elsewhere. (Photo: Lord Browne, credit: Getty Images)

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